Playing pretend isn’t just an activity in our house, it’s something Roo is doing constantly. I can’t count the number of times I’ve put her to bed by saying “Goodnight, puppy,” instead of her name. While sitting at the table for meals, she is better behaved and more involved if we are all acting as a different character. Her bathtub is a boat. Her slide is a mountain. Our dog is a lion. And on and on it goes.
Children begin role playing or dramatic play around the age of two. (Roo started around 18 months.) Dramatic play is a necessary part of a child’s development. Among other benefits, it encourages their imaginations and empathy. They are literally putting themselves in someone elses shoes! It can also empower them to make decisions and take risks they wouldn’t otherwise feel comfortable doing.
What is more empowering than pretending to be a queen! (Or king, or prince, or princess.)
For this you’ll need:
Paper (construction or printer paper works fine, but for sturdiness, we used poster board)
Paint supplies
Glue
Rhinestones/Glitter/Sequins/Anything sparkly!
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Start by making a quick measurement of your child’s head. Cut the paper or poster board that length, plus 2-3 inches. Add paper with glue or tape as needed.
Then cut a few points at the top of the rectangle. You can let your child dictate how many and what size to you if they are old enough. We want to give them as much involvement as possible!
Let them paint away!20180721_161749_001
Wait for the paint to dry and then glue on the shineys
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When it’s dry, tape, glue, or staple the crown together and bow to the royalty.
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Remind your monarch to be kind and fair, but otherwise allow them to boss you around during the play session. Encourage them to share their crown (and authority) with siblings and friends! There’s so many lessons to share during this particular drama…
Post your crown pictures! Let’s see your monarchs!

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